Peg Shrug

Peg Shrug

Cast On: May 17, 2014
Cast Off: May 17, 2014
Pattern: Peg Shrug (Improvised) by Hooker Leo
Needle: Unknown Size
Yarn A: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Magenta]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Yarn B: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Multicolor]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Yarn C: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Pink]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Yarn D: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Multicolor]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Dimensions: 30 x 12 inches (open)

So because I am sick…again…I decided to stay home and see if I could crank something out from all the novelty yarn I have collected. About a couple of weeks ago, I organized most of the novelty yarn by color.

Basically, I double stranded the yarns, connecting a new yarn when one yarn ran out, and cast on 45 stitches on about a US 15/17/19 needle. Worked in garter stitch, this shrug is very shallow, only sewing the corners together to create the armhole. As you can see, I stared with the magenta yarn, which is some kind of chenille or velour, double stranded with a multicolor knobby yarn. When the chenille ran out I attached a pink mohair type yarn. When the knobby yarn ran out, I attached the final multicolor bouclé yarn.

I did not continue into the purple novelty because the color would have been lopsided and I thought it was long enough. I would have preferred something longer/deeper, but had already cast off. What is interesting about this shrug, is that one side is heavier (chenille side/knobby) than the other (mohair/bouclé). I think this coincidental design makes it appropriate for either cold or warm nights; all you have to do is decide how warm you want your shoulders to be.

I am unsure of the fiber content of any of the yarns and did not perform a burn test on any of them. I am pretty sure the chenille is some kind of acrylic with nylon; the bouclé is almost certainly some kind of acrylic, as well as the knobby yarn; and the mohair type yarn could possible be real mohair.

The name of this project – Peg by Steely Dan – is a selection from my music library.

Price: USD $40.00

 

Peg Shrug

Peg Shrug

Cast On: May 17, 2014
Cast Off: May 17, 2014
Pattern: Peg Shrug (Improvised) by Hooker Leo
Needle: Unknown Size
Yarn A: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Magenta]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Yarn B: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Multicolor]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Yarn C: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Pink]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Yarn D: Unknown (Fiber Content: Unknown; Yarn Color: [Multicolor]; Yarn Weight: Unknown)
Dimensions: 30 x 12 inches (open)

So because I am sick…again…I decided to stay home and see if I could crank something out from all the novelty yarn I have collected. About a couple of weeks ago, I organized most of the novelty yarn by color.

Basically, I double stranded the yarns, connecting a new yarn when one yarn ran out, and cast on 45 stitches on about a US 15/17/19 needle. Worked in garter stitch, this shrug is very shallow, only sewing the corners together to create the armhole. As you can see, I stared with the magenta yarn, which is some kind of chenille or velour, double stranded with a multicolor knobby yarn. When the chenille ran out I attached a pink mohair type yarn. When the knobby yarn ran out, I attached the final multicolor bouclé yarn.

I did not continue into the purple novelty because the color would have been lopsided and I thought it was long enough. I would have preferred something longer/deeper, but had already cast off. What is interesting about this shrug, is that one side is heavier (chenille side/knobby) than the other (mohair/bouclé). I think this coincidental design makes it appropriate for either cold or warm nights; all you have to do is decide how warm you want your shoulders to be.

I am unsure of the fiber content of any of the yarns and did not perform a burn test on any of them. I am pretty sure the chenille is some kind of acrylic with nylon; the bouclé is almost certainly some kind of acrylic, as well as the knobby yarn; and the mohair type yarn could possible be real mohair.

The name of this project – Peg by Steely Dan – is a selection from my music library.

Price: USD $40.00

 

Again And Again Hats

Cast On: May 8, 2014
Cast Off: May 16, 2018
Pattern A: Seed Stitch Beanie by Lisa Gentry from Leisure Arts Slouchy Beanies and Headwraps

Yarn A: Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice (Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic; Yarn Color: 149 Silver Grey?; Yarn Weight: 4)
Yarn B: Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice (Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic; Yarn Color: 151 Charcoal Grey; Yarn Weight: 4)

Pattern B: Ribbed Beanie by Lisa Gentry from Leisure Arts Slouchy Beanies and Headwraps

Yarn: Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice (Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic; Yarn Color: 151 Charcoal Grey; Yarn Weight: 4)

I was given this project by the store owner, for a customer who’s daughter had purchased the supplies, but decided not to make the hats for her and her boyfriend. I will admit that I was not a happy hooker when I received this assignment and to be rigorously honest, I entered “angry knitting” mode. Angry knitting was explained to me by a child that came into the store one day with her mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. When I asked her what angry knitting was, she explained that her stitches were too tight. I have expanded on that definition: focused and intent knitting on a project that is challenging when you would rather be crocheting.

The patterns were well written and the hats worked in the round, an added benefit because I dislike seaming knitting. I am not a fan of DPNs, preferring a couple of circulars instead, but even this proved difficult towards the end of the first hat. On the second, I found an extra set of circulars on the table and borrowed them. Using three circulars versus two made finishing the second hat a little easier. I was asked to make the hats based on the larger size (21 inch circumference): the first one slide right over my head, which leads me to believe my tension was too loose; the second actually grips the head, so I think my tension improved.

I am glad to be done and think this is the last time I will knit something in the round. My index fingers hurt and the tightening of the stitches as the circle closes is not a fun experience, especially when you are trying to knit three together. I am glad that I got over my knitting dislike which resulted from a dropped stitch in my Black And White Cowl, which is a currently hibernating template for the Happy Cowl. I still have to finish the Orange Crush Shawl and a knitting blank, which now I wish I had crocheted versus knitting. Doh! Having done a little yarn reorganization, I also have sorted my novelty yarns from my Japanese grandmother by color and they are just waiting to become scarves, wraps, cowls, shawls…easy stuff. But all knitting will go on hold again, as I complete the Ballet-Neck Tee from Vogue Knitting Crochet Special Collector’s Edition magazine.

Goody Two Shoes Baby Booties

Goody Two Shoes Baby Booties
Goody Two Shoes Baby Booties
©A Hooker’s World

On da Hook: May 9, 2014
Off da Hook: May 12, 2014
Pattern: Crochet wrap around button infant boots- girls and boys by Ashlee of I’m Topsy Turvy
Yarn: Caron Simply Soft (Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic; Yarn Color: 9730 Autumn Red; Yarn Weight: 4)
Hook: Clover G/6 – 3.75 mm

I finally finished them! I am definitely going through a funk. Normally, a project like this would only take a couple of hours at most, but this time it took me three days…at least. I just could not get into the project: changing from a Boye to a Bates to a Clover hook, as one of my primary reasons. I think working at such a tight gauge also threw me off. I am, however, very proud of the finished object. The first time I made these, I fudged up the pattern and counts. This time, despite the counts not being exact, the outcome is much better. I even went as far as to buy the buttons and sew them on!

My friend Eve is having twins: a boy and a girl. In case you can’t tell the difference above, the booties with the scalloped edge are for the girl and the booties with the crab stitch edge are for the boy. The color was one of three requested by the mother. Last I heard, mom was in the hospital, under observation. I need to find out where she is so I can deliver my gift.

Goody Two Shoes Baby Booties

Goody Two Shoes Baby Booties
Goody Two Shoes Baby Booties
©A Hooker’s World

On da Hook: May 9, 2014
Off da Hook: May 12, 2014
Pattern: Crochet wrap around button infant boots- girls and boys by Ashlee of I’m Topsy Turvy
Yarn: Caron Simply Soft (Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic; Yarn Color: 9730 Autumn Red; Yarn Weight: 4)
Hook: Clover G/6 – 3.75 mm

I finally finished them! I am definitely going through a funk. Normally, a project like this would only take a couple of hours at most, but this time it took me three days…at least. I just could not get into the project: changing from a Boye to a Bates to a Clover hook, as one of my primary reasons. I think working at such a tight gauge also threw me off. I am, however, very proud of the finished object. The first time I made these, I fudged up the pattern and counts. This time, despite the counts not being exact, the outcome is much better. I even went as far as to buy the buttons and sew them on!

My friend Eve is having twins: a boy and a girl. In case you can’t tell the difference above, the booties with the scalloped edge are for the girl and the booties with the crab stitch edge are for the boy. The color was one of three requested by the mother. Last I heard, mom was in the hospital, under observation. I need to find out where she is so I can deliver my gift.

Rowan Yarn

Rowan
Rowan
source: knitrowan.com

The other day, while working, I decided to peruse the pattern books, looking for a crochet pattern that I could make as a store sample to feature the yarn we are selling. My current favorite is the Rowan Linen. I was very disappointed that I could not find one crochet pattern in any of the pattern books, so I decided to convey my dismay to the company:

I work in a yarn store, as an associate and crochet instructor. We sell your yarn and as such, we have some pattern books. Loving your linen, I looked through the book to find a crochet pattern I could make to promote yarn sales. THERE WAS NOT A SINGLE CROCHET PATTERN IN ANY OF THE ROWAN BOOKS. Needless to say, I am very disappointed. Not everyone knits!

I received the following reply:

Thank you for your recent e-mail.

We are sorry to hear that you are disappointed with the lack of crochet designs. We are a hand knitting company therefore, we do tend to produce many more knitting patterns however, you can view all of our crochet designs on the following section of our website.

Apparently, if one spends enough time around someone, their personalities can be transferred by osmosis. That someone is my freelance graphic/web design boss, who has a strong sales/marketing background. Here is my final reply:

Thank you for your reply. Below are some additional comments, which I hope you will take into serious consideration. Whether you do, or not, is entirely your choice as a company, but my many years working in sales and marketing, always has me thinking and willing to share business improvement suggestions.

As a yarn company, I suggest you start including at least one crochet pattern in your books. You are not selling hand-knitting, you are selling yarn, which is used by both crocheters and knitters.

I am also a designer, so a lack of crochet patterns is not my issue either. From a marketing perspective: In my store, we like to make something from the books provided as a store sample, so the customer can purchase the book and yarn at the same time and feel like they have a kit. Honestly, I don’t know whether or not the pattern books are for sale, but I am sure you can understand a customers sense of satisfaction knowing they have the pattern and the yarn to make an item.

One last thing to consider from a marketing perspective: by not including crochet patterns in your book an exclusionary perception could be developed by your customers. For instance, as a crocheter, I was put off that there was not one crochet pattern in all your books. This could potentially lead to a lost market. My belief is better to be inclusionary than exclusionary.

That’s all I have to say. I hope you will take my suggestions seriously, as I love your yarns and would hate to “exclude” you when it comes to making purchase decisions.

Touch-A, Touch-A, Touch-A Touch Me Afghan

Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch-a Touch Me Afghan
Touch-a, Touch-a, Touch-a Touch Me Afghan
©Annette Corsino

Recipe: Touch-A, Touch-A, Touch-A Touch Me Afghan by Hooker Leo for Gilda Ongkeko
Yarn: Muench Touch Me (Fiber Content: 72% Rayon Microfiber/28% Wool; about 61 yards/50 grams; Yarn Color: 3650?; Yarn Weight: 4)
Hook: Bates US G/6 – 4 mm
Dimensions: 50 x 76 inches

I did not make this afghan. This a recipe I wrote up for Gilda Ongkeko, a yarn representative for Muench Touch Me yarn, a yarn that I think will be available for purchase at The Knitting Tree, L A.

The construction is all front loop half double crochets, so it probably could be classified as an easy/beginner recipe. I am unsure of the color pictured, and based on the sample card on the website, I am guessing the color pictured is 3650. The pattern is available for free; simply follow the link above to download a PDF document.

This yarn is a soft and plush chenille textured yarn, lending a touch of luxuriousness to your projects.

Recipe Proviso

As with all my recipes:

  • We condone any realized profit from selling your finished project
  • If you are on Ravelry, we would appreciate your linking your project to this recipe, so we can send a request to feature your finished object

 

When I Think Of You Scarf

When I Think Of You Scarf
When I Think Of You Scarf
©A Hooker’s World

On da Hook: May 6, 2014
Off da Hook: May 7, 2014
Pattern: When I Think Of You Scarf by Hooker Leo (In Development)
Yarn A: Be Sweet Bambino Taffy (Fiber Content: 70% Organically Grown Cotton/30% Bamboo; Yarn Color: 883 Spearmint Gum; Yarn Weight: 4)
Yarn B: Be Sweet Bambino Taffy (Fiber Content: 70% Organically Grown Cotton/30% Bamboo; Yarn Color: 881 Salt Water Taffy; Yarn Weight: 4)
Hook: Bates US G/6 – 4.0 mm
Dimensions: 86 x 5 inches

I was so excited when I learned that the Skacel Zauberball Crazy yarn had come in, so Lenora and I could begin the updated Convergence sweater pattern pictured in the 2013 Crochet Special Collector’s Issue of Vogue Knitting. My excitement was quickly quelled when a phone call from Min indicated that she was going to make it as well, leaving only two balls left. I suppose I could start, as more yarn has been ordered, but I was really excited to begin my first top/sweater.

So, I started looking through the Rowan and Berroco books for a crochet pattern I could make as a store sample. I was sadly disappointed that the Rowan books only had knitting patterns. It’s not that I can’t knit, but as the crochet instructor at the store, I have to represent. The Berroco books were ideal as they explicitly indicated whether the item pictured was crocheted or knitted, saving time of perusing each pattern for determination. I am writing both company’s with my opinions.

Finally, Bruce suggested something out of the Be Sweet Bambino, which has just been marked down 25%. I had just seen the Mitered Squares Scarf by Annette Petavy on Ravelry and knowing I could make that without purchasing the pattern, I set to designing. Allow me to comment on the Be Sweet yarn at this point. It is a nice cotton/bamboo blend with – what one might describe as soutache – plied together. I am not an organic type of person, so I find the price point for the yarn to be exorbitant. I used the Bambino Taffy which is comprised of five colors that are tied/knotted – yes, knotted – together. Coincidentally, my pattern works out so that there is enough of each color within the skein for a single square.

The pattern includes my color scheme if you wish to duplicate the scarf pictured. Lenora prompted me to write up the pattern quickly, so she could purchase it for her daughter, who like Be Sweet yarn. While writing it up, I thought: “Why not ask her daughter to test the pattern and give it to her for free?” That is my plan and I’m sticking to it. I am awaiting confirmation from the daughter to test the pattern. Once it has been tested, I will make it available in the patterns section and on Ravelry.

C’est Si Bon Blocking/Yoga Mat & Carrier

C'est Si Bon Blocking/Yoga Mat & Carrier
C'est Si Bon Blocking/Yoga Mat & Carrier
©A Hooker’s World

Price: USD $60.00 ($54.00: Yarn + $6.00: Mat) + applicable shipping

So while I was trying to overcome my cough last week, I decided I was feeling bettah and decided to – at least – organize my room. While I was organizing, I found a yoga mat that I had purchased at a yard sale to use for blocking my projects. Needless to say, I am not about to start yoga-ing and I really don’t like blocking. In conjunction with my game plan to attack my stash, I set to creating this carrier. When I tried it on, I slung it over one shoulder, and as you can see in the picture above, Mergatroid was able to drape it across her chest.

Yarn A: Caron Simply Soft (Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic, Yarn Color: 0001 White; Yarn Weight: 3), double-stranded with
Yarn B: Lion Brand Fun Fur Prints (Fiber Content: 100% Polyester; Yarn Color: 206 Confetti; Yarn Weight: 5)
Yarn C: Unknown Eyelash
Yarn D: Unknown Eyelash
Yarn E: Unknown Eyelash
Hook: US J/10 – 6.0 mm
Mat Dimensions: 68 (length) x 24 (width) x .25 inches (height)
Carrier Dimensions: 21.5 (height) x 5.5 (diameter) inches.

Dislcaimer: The carrier opening has been cinched to prevent stretching, so the mat must be rolled snuggly for insertion.

New Skill: Crochet Afghan Repair

Crochet Afghan Repair: Before

I suspect my boss took this repair into the store, assuming I could fix it. I have been asked before to fix something and ended up re-crocheting the afghan because I could not understand how I could make the repairs, as crochet is done on completed stitches. That seems easy enough, but when I thought about the last (top) row being worked in the the stitches above, I just could not conceive any idea on how to accomplish that.

Well, money is one of my great motivators, especially because I don’t have any. Because I am fond of my bosses for giving me an opportunity for stable employment, I said I would try, but made sure, she knew I wanted premium pricing. The initial repair – the blue section – seemed easy enough and when I got to the big hole, the ease of repair continued, though presented more of a challenge in its approach.

I think we matched the color pretty closely and while I did not perform the puff stitch in the exact same manner, I am proud of my work on this afghan repair. What do you think?