Natural High Mobius Cowl

Natural High Mobius Cowl
Natural High Mobius Cowl
©A Hooker’s World

Having rummaged through my stash recently to donate some yarn to Studio Royale Assisted Living Knit Group, I actually used some of my scraps to make this seamed mobius cowl, which will be donated to Handmade Especially For You. I made the mistake of “seaming” this into a mobius. I only say that because I am deciding that a mobius cowl should only be for shorter cowls that one would not wrap twice.

Only two yarns were identifiable:

  • Super Yarn Mart! Superlon (Fiber Content: 100% Super Spun Acrylic; Yarn Color: 100 Black; Yarn Weight: 4, Worsted)
  • Plymouth Encore (Fiber Content: 75% Acrylic, 25% Wool; Yarn Color: 0256; Yarn Weight: 4, Worsted)

The third identifiable yarn was the bought at The Knitting Tree, L A to finish this piece: Feza Lady (Fiber Content: 100% Nylon; Yarn Color: 112; Yarn Weight: 4, Aran)

Apparently, I got used to the new wimpy worsted weight yarns and used a US 8/H – 5 mm hook, which cause portions of the cowl fabric to be dense. Crucify me for my attitude, but it’s a donation, so I am not really concerned, but have taken the knowledge and will apply in future projects.

The name of this cowl – Natural High by Bloodstone – comes from the colors used: white, ecru, browns, blacks and greys.

If you are keen to make something similar, here is the recipe: 24 double crochets worked between stitches to desired length with a crab stitch border of the Feza Lady, triple-stranded.

New Skill: Crochet Afghan Repair

Crochet Afghan Repair: Before

I suspect my boss took this repair into the store, assuming I could fix it. I have been asked before to fix something and ended up re-crocheting the afghan because I could not understand how I could make the repairs, as crochet is done on completed stitches. That seems easy enough, but when I thought about the last (top) row being worked in the the stitches above, I just could not conceive any idea on how to accomplish that.

Well, money is one of my great motivators, especially because I don’t have any. Because I am fond of my bosses for giving me an opportunity for stable employment, I said I would try, but made sure, she knew I wanted premium pricing. The initial repair – the blue section – seemed easy enough and when I got to the big hole, the ease of repair continued, though presented more of a challenge in its approach.

I think we matched the color pretty closely and while I did not perform the puff stitch in the exact same manner, I am proud of my work on this afghan repair. What do you think?

Bacon & Eggs Scarf

Bacon & Eggs Scarf
Bacon & Eggs Scarf
©A Hooker’s World

On da Hook: April 14, 2014
Off da Hook: April 15, 2014
Pattern: Bacon and Eggs Scarf by Twinkie Chan
Yarn A: Cascade Cherub Aran Sparkle; Yarn Color: 208 Prune Purple; Fiber Content: 54% Nylon, 42% Acrylic, 4% Metallic; Yarn Weight: 4
Yarn B: Plymouth Encore Worsted; Yarn Color: 0256 Ecru; Fiber Content: 75% Acrylic, 20% Wool; Yarn Weight: 4
Yarn C: Schachenmayr Bravo Worsted; Yarn Color: 08224 White; Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic; Yarn Weight: 4
Yarn D: Universal Uptown Worsted; Yarn Color: 327 Bright Yellow; Fiber Content: 100% Acrylic; Yarn Weight: 4
Hook: Bates US H/8 – 5.0 mm
Dimensions: 92 x 4.5 inches

This was made as a sample for The Knitting Tree, L A. It only took two days to make all the components and sew them together. The wording in the pattern was a bit unusual, but easily modified into something I could understand. While I detest sewing components together, this was not so bad. My guess is because the seams are so short and there is not a multitude of components to seam together. The most popular comment at the store was that the eggs look like boobies. WTH? They look like eggs to me and they were fun to make. My bacon differs from the original pattern in that I added an additional two stripes of the darker color for a more balanced piece of bacon.